The MacGregor Legacy - For Love or Loyalty

1760 Scotland - To atone for her father's evil, Lauren Campbell agrees to help Malcolm MacGregor. By the time she realizes she's the bargaining price to free Malcolm's mother from indentured servitude, it's too late.

Path of Freedom, Quilts of Love series

1858 North Carolina - When Quakers Flora Saferight and Bruce Millikan embark on the Underground Railroad, they agree to put their differences aside to save the lives of a pregnant slave couple..

Highland Sanctuary, (Highland series - Book 2)

1477 Scotland - A chieftain heir is hired to restore Briagh Castle and discovers a hidden village of outcasts who have created their own private sanctuary from the world.

Highland Blessings, (Book 1 - Highland series)

1473 Scotland - The story of a highland warrior who kidnaps the daughter of his greatest enemy and clan chief to honor a promise to his dying father.

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Word of Inspiration: Jesus Is the Cure

"Now, therefore, you are no longer strangers and foreigners, but fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God." (Ephesians 2:19)

If you have accepted Christ and believe in Him, don't allow the enemy or this world to make you feel lonely or as if you don't belong anywhere. You belong to the family of God, the Most High. He knows your heart and thoughts. As His child, you can tap into the power of His forgiveness and love, the ultimate cure for emotional pain, depression and guilt. Jesus is the cure!

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

CFBA Blog Tour - "The Face of Heaven" by Murray Pura

#christianfiction, #christianromance
 
The
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
The Face of Heaven
Harvest House Publishers
by
Murray Pura


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Murray Pura was born and raised in Manitoba, just north of Minnesota and the Dakotas. He has published several novels and short story collections in Canada, and has been short-listed for a number of awards. His first books to be published in the United States are the inspirational works Rooted and Streams (both by Zondervan in 2010). His first novel to debut in the USA is A Bride’s Flight from Virginia City, Montana (Barbour), which was released January 2012. The second, The Wings of Morning, will be published by Harvest House on February 1. Both of these novels center around the Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.


ABOUT THE BOOK:

In April 1861, Lyndel Keim discovers two runaway slaves in her family's barn. When the men are captured and returned to their plantation, Lyndel and her young Amish beau, Nathaniel King, find themselves at odds with their pacifist Amish colony

Nathaniel enlists in what will become the famous Iron Brigade of the Union Army. Lyndel enters the fray as a Brigade nurse on the battlefield, sticking close to Nathaniel as they both witness the horrors of war--including the battles at Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, and Antietam. Despite the pair's heroic sacrifices, the Amish only see that Lyndel and Nathaniel have become part of the war effort, and both are banished.

And a severe battle wound at Gettysburg threatens Nathaniel's life. Lyndel must call upon her faith in God to endure the savage conflict and to face its painful aftermath, not knowing if Nathaniel is alive or dead. Will the momentous battle change her life forever, just as it will change the course of the war and the history of her country?

If you would like to read the first chapter of The Face of Heaven, go HERE.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Wild Card Book Tour - "Angel of the Cove" by Sandra Robbins


#christianfiction, #christianromance


Today's Wild Card author is:


and the book:

Harvest House Publishers 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Sandra Robbins and her husband live in the small college town in Tennessee where she grew up. They count their four children and five grandchildren as the greatest blessings in their lives. Her published books include stories in historical romance and romantic suspense. When not writing or spending time with her family, Sandra enjoys reading, collecting flow blue china, and playing the piano.


Visit the author's website.


SHORT BOOK DESCRIPTION:


Anna Prentiss wants to be a nurse, but first she has to spend a summer in Cades Cove apprenticing to the local midwife. Anna is determined to prove herself…but she never expected to fall in love with the Cove. Has God’s plan for Anna changed? Or is she just starting to hear Him clearly?

Product Details:
List Price: $13.99

Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Harvest House Publishers (August 1, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0736948848
ISBN-13: 978-0736948845



AND NOW...THE FIRST CHAPTER:


Mountain air was supposed to be cool. At least that’s what she’d always heard.


Anna Prentiss couldn’t be sure because she’d never been this far into the mountains before. But if truth be told, they still had a fair piece to go before they reached the hills that rolled off into the distance.


The narrow dirt road that led them closer to those hills twisted and bumped its way along. The June heat had dried out the winter mud in this part of Tennessee and produced a dust that threatened to choke her, roiling up and around the buggy. Anna covered her mouth with the lace handkerchief her mother had tucked in her dress pocket and sneezed. The smudge left on the cloth made her wonder what her face must look like.


She glanced at Uncle Charles, her father’s brother, who sat beside her on the leather seat of the buggy. Perspiration had cut meandering, dusty trails down his cheeks, but he didn’t appear to notice. His attention was focused on trying to avoid the holes that dotted the road.


She wiped at her face once more before stuffing the handkerchief back in her pocket. It really didn’t matter what she looked like. There was no one to see her. The only living creatures she’d seen all day were some white-tailed deer that had run across the road in front of them and a fox that had peered at her from his dusky hiding place beside the road. In front of them trees lined the long roadway that twisted and turned like a lazy snake slithering deeper into the mountain wilderness. She’d come a long way from the farm in Strawberry Plains.


A twinge of homesickness washed over her. She closed her eyes and gritted her teeth. The uneasy feeling lingered a moment, but with a determination she’d only recently acquired, she banished thoughts of those she’d left behind to the spot in her heart where her grief lay buried.


Just then the buggy hit a hole, and Anna grabbed the seat to keep from bouncing onto the floorboard. Uncle Charles flicked the reins across the horse’s back and glanced at her, his spectacles resting on the bridge of his nose. Wispy gray hair stuck out from underneath a black hat.


“Hold on. These roads can be a little rough. We had a hard winter up here.”


Anna nodded, straightening herself on the buggy seat and studying her uncle’s profile. How many times had he ridden this way to take care of the mountain people he loved? He looked every bit the country doctor. His smooth hands, so unlike her father’s work-roughened ones, gripped the reins tighter as he grinned at her.


The corner of his mouth curled downward when he smiled, just as her father’s had always done. That was the only similarity she’d ever seen in them, though. Uncle Charles used to say he got the brains and Poppa got the brawn. When she was a little girl, she wondered what he meant. But she knew no matter what it implied, the two brothers shared a bond like few she’d ever seen. And they were the only ones who’d ever encouraged her to follow her dream of becoming a nurse.


Anna took a deep breath and inhaled the heavy, sweet smell that drifted from the forests on either side of the road. She turned to Uncle Charles. “I’ve been noticing those white flowers that look like shrubs growing along the road. What are they?”


“Those are our mountain rhododendron,” said Uncle Charles. “There are also pink and purple ones. Sometimes in the summer you can stand on a ridge and look across the mountains at the rhododendrons blooming, and it looks like somebody took a paintbrush and colored the world. It’s a mighty beautiful sight.”


Anna swiveled in her seat again and looked at Uncle Charles. “Thank you for working out this trip for me.”


A grin tugged at his mouth. “How many times would you say you’ve thanked me today?”


“Not enough yet.”


A sudden breeze ruffled the straw hat her mother had given her, and Anna grabbed the wide brim. After a moment she released it and pulled the handkerchief from her pocket again. Grasping it with both hands, she twisted the cloth until it stretched taut between her fingers. “I hope I don’t disappoint Mrs. Lawson.”


He didn’t take his eyes off the road but shrugged. “I wouldn’t worry about that. She’s been delivering babies in Cades Cove for a long time, and she’s glad to have an extra pair of hands. It’ll be good experience before you leave for nursing school in the fall.”


The old anger rose in Anna’s throat. “Only if Robert agrees.” She spit out the barbed words as if they pierced the inside of her mouth. “Why does he have to be so selfish?” She clenched her fists tight together. Ever since their father’s death Robert had assumed the role as head of the family, and he took his responsibilities seriously. Too seriously, if you asked Anna. He never missed an opportunity to tell her how their father wasn’t around anymore to cater to her every whim. The first time he’d said that she felt as if he’d shattered her heart. The pieces had never mended as far as her relationship with him was concerned. But if things went as planned, she would soon be free of his authority.


“I don’t want you to be angry with your brother, Anna. You may not understand his reasons, but he’s trying his best to be the head of your family. He’s still young and has a lot to learn, but he loves you and wants what’s best for you.”


Anna crossed her arms and scowled. “All he wants is for me to stay on the farm and marry somebody he thinks will make a good husband.” Anna shook her head. “Well, that’s not what I want. Poppa promised me I’d be able to go. Robert has no right to keep that money hostage.”


“I know. Your father would have been so proud to know you’ve been accepted.” Uncle Charles’s shoulders drooped with the sigh that drifted from his mouth. “Try to see it from his perspective. You’ve led a sheltered life on the farm, and Robert feels like you aren’t ready for what you’ll see and have to deal with in a big hospital in New York. You think you’ll be able to assist injured and dying people, but it’s different when you’re right there with somebody’s life in your hands. If you find you can’t do it, then Robert is out the money for your tuition, not to mention travel and living expenses.” He cocked a bushy eyebrow at Anna. “And he doesn’t need to be wasting money that can be put to good use on the farm.”


“I know. He’s told me often enough.” Anna smoothed out her skirt and straightened in her seat. “I’m just thankful you came up with a plan that Robert agreed to. Spending the summer with Mrs. Lawson ought to prove I have the grit to handle New York.”


“Remember you’ll need a good report from Granny Lawson.”


Anna smiled. “You don’t have to worry about that. I’m going to listen to her and do everything she tells me, no matter how distasteful I think the task is.” She clenched her fists in her lap. “When I board that train for New York in the fall, it will all be worth it.”


Uncle Charles shook his head and chuckled. “I’ll leave New York and all its hustle and bustle to you. I prefer to spend my time right here in these mountains.”


Anna let her gaze rove over the trees on either side of the road. “Still, maybe you’ll come visit me someday. I can show off the maternity ward!”


He flicked the reins across the horse’s back. “I’ve read a lot about that ward. First one in the country. You’ll be fortunate to work there. But don’t forget you may see a lot of babies born this summer while you’re at Granny’s cabin. And there’s not a better place in the world to learn about nursing. She can teach you things you would never learn at Bellevue. Listen to her and do what she says and you’ll be fine.”


Anna nodded. “I will.” Her hat slipped to the side, and she reached up and straightened it. “I really can’t thank you enough, Uncle Charles. Everything’s coming together just the way I planned it, and nothing—not even Robert—is going to stand in my way.”


Uncle Charles sucked in his breath and directed a frown at her. “Nothing? We can only follow the plan God has for us, Anna.”


She settled back on the seat and cast her eyes over the hazy hills in front of them. “But that is God’s plan for me.”


“And how do you know?”


“Because it’s what I’ve dreamed about all my life. God’s never tried to change my mind.”


“Maybe you’ve never listened to Him.” Uncle Charles stared at her a moment. “Like I said, pay attention to what Granny says. She’ll teach you how God uses those He’s chosen to take care of the sick. It isn’t all done with medicine, Anna. A lot of my medical successes—and Granny’s as well—have come about after a lot of prayer.”


The buggy hit another bump, and Anna bounced straight up. As far as she could see, the rippling Smoky Mountains stretched out toward the horizon. A plume of wispy fog hung over the valleys. A strange world awaited her out there.


Mrs. Johnson, the owner of the inn where they’d stayed in Pigeon Forge last night, had taken great pleasure in warning her of what she might face in Cades Cove this summer. Anna clasped her hands in her lap and glanced at Uncle Charles. “Mrs. Johnson said the folks who live in Cades Cove don’t take to strangers.”


Uncle Charles nodded. “That doesn’t surprise me. What else did she say?”


Anna took a deep breath and brushed at the new layer of dust on her skirt. “Oh, not much. Just that everybody knows it’s a closed society in the Cove, but it doesn’t matter because no sensible person would want to live there anyway. She called the people there a strange lot.”


Uncle Charles cocked an eyebrow and chuckled. “Is that right? I hope you didn’t believe her. I know every family in the Cove, and some of them are my good friends.” He hesitated a moment. “Of course you’re going to find some who cause problems—just like you would anywhere else.”


“Like the moonshiners?”


He turned to stare at her with wide eyes. “What did Mrs. Johnson tell you about moonshiners?”


“She said all the men were moonshiners. Are they?”


Uncle Charles threw back his head and laughed as if he’d just heard the funniest joke of his life. After a few seconds he shook his head. “Nothing could be further from the truth. There may be a few who give the Cove people a bad reputation, but most of the men work too hard to waste their time on such nonsense.” He reached over and patted her hand. “I wouldn’t leave you in a place where you weren’t safe. Mrs. Johnson may run a good inn, but she’s the worst gossip in these mountains.”


Anna heaved a sigh of relief. “I guess I’m just a little nervous. I want everybody to like me.”


“They will. Just be yourself and they’ll all love you.”


Uncle Charles meant well, but doubt still lingered in her mind. Would the people of the Cove accept a stranger into their small community? And if they didn’t, what good could she possibly do in this place?


She had to succeed. Her future depended on it. She squared her shoulders. There was no turning back.


As the day wore on, they found themselves deeper in the hills. As they did, a slow awakening began to dawn in the deepest corner of her soul. She’d never seen anything as beautiful as the lush growth that covered the vast mountain range. The air now grew cooler, just as she’d expected it to be, and the sweet smell of mountain laurel mingled with the rhododendrons. As her uncle’s horse, Toby, plodded along the rocky trail that grew steeper with each step, she saw the world through new eyes and stared in awe at the wonders of nature unfolding before her.


For the last hour she’d sat silent and watched the shallow river that flowed beside the road. The water bubbled over rocks like huge stepping-stones scattered across its bed, and the rippling sound had a lulling effect. She wished they could stop so she could pull off her shoes and wade in the cold mountain stream, but there was no time for such fun today. She turned her attention back to the steep hillside on the other side of the road.


“It’s beautiful here.”


Uncle Charles glanced at her. “We’re just about to Wear’s Valley. When we get there, we’ll be close to Cades Cove.”


Anna wondered if Uncle Charles was tired of her questions about the Cove. She hoped not. She settled in her seat and said, “Tell me more about Cades Cove, Uncle Charles.”


He pushed his hat back on his head and stared straight ahead. “Well, if you’ve noticed, we’ve been following that stream as the road’s climbed. Pretty soon now we’re gonna reach a place where we turn away from it and head into a flat valley right in the middle of the mountains. That’s Cades Cove. It’s almost like God just took His giant hand and tucked a little piece of heaven right down in the Smokies. The land’s fertile—not so many rocks you can’t farm—and completely surrounded by mountains. You’re gonna love it when you see it, Anna.”


“How many people live there?”


He pursed his lips and squinted into the distance. “I’d say there are about two hundred fifty scattered throughout the Cove nowadays. Some left for town life—better work there, you know—but they’ll never find a place that’s as beautiful as these mountains.”


“How far is it from Mrs. Lawson’s house to where you live?”


He thought for a moment. “It’s not that far as the crow flies, but it takes me almost three hours going around these roads.”


A lump formed in her throat. Now that they were closer, she didn’t want him to leave. She scooted a little closer to him on the bench of the buggy. “Will you stay at Mrs. Lawson’s tonight?”


He shook his head. “No, I’ll have enough daylight left to get home. But don’t worry, I’ll come to the Cove from time to time to check on you. Granny does a good job of taking care of the folks there, but she knows when it’s serious enough to send for me.”


Anna clasped her hands in her lap to keep him from seeing them tremble. The time had come to begin the test. She couldn’t fail. She squared her shoulders and lifted her chin. She dredged up all the determination she could muster. No, she wouldn’t fail.


“How long before we get there, Uncle Charles?”


“Not much longer. The entrance is up ahead.”



Wednesday, August 15, 2012

CFBA Blog Tour - "Over the Edge" by Mary Connealy

The
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Over The Edge
Bethany House
by
Mary Connealy


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:



Mary Connealy writes romantic comedy with cowboys. She is a Christy Award Finalist, a Carol Award Finalist and an IRCC Award finalist.

The Lassoed in Texas Series, Petticoat Ranch, Calico Canyon and Gingham Mountain. Petticoat Ranch was a Carol Award Finalist. Calico Canyon was a Christy Award Finalist and a Carol Award Finalist. These three books are now contained in one large volume called Lassoed in Texas Trilogy.

The Montana Marriages Series, Montana Rose, The Husband Tree and Wildflower Bride. Montana Rose was a Carol Award Finalist.

Cowboy Christmas—the 2010 Carol Award for Best Long Historical Romance, and an Inspirational Readers Choice Contest Finalist.

The Sophie's Daughters series. Doctor in Petticoats, Wrangler in Petticoats, Sharpshooter in Petticoats.

She is also the author of; Black Hills Blessing a 3-in-1 collection of sweet contemporary romances, Nosy in Nebraska, a 3-in-1 collection of cozy romantic mysteries and she's one of the three authors contributing to Alaska Brides with her Carol Award Winning historical romance Golden Days.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Seth Kincaid survived a fire in a cave, but he's never been the same. He was always a reckless youth, but now he's gone over the edge. He ran off to the Civil War and came back crazier than ever.

After the war, nearly dead from his injuries, it appears Seth got married. Oh, he's got a lot of excuses, but his wife isn't happy to find out Seth doesn't remember her. Callie has searched, prayed, and worried. Now she's come to the Kincaid family's ranch in Colorado to find her lost husband.

Callie isn't a long-suffering woman. Once she knows her husband is alive, she wants to kill him. She's not even close to forgiving him for abandoning her.

Then more trouble shows up in the form of a secret Seth's pa kept for years. The Kincaid brothers might lose their ranch if they can't sort things out. It's enough to drive a man insane--but somehow it's all making Seth see things more clearly. And now that he knows what he wants, no one better stand in his way.

If you would like to read the first chapter of Over The Edge, go HERE.

Wednesday, August 08, 2012

CFBA Blog Tour - "Chasing the Wind" by Pamela Ewen

#christianfiction, #christianromance
 
The
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Chasing The Wind
B&H Books (August 1, 2012)
by
Pamela Ewen


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Until recently retiring to write full time, Pamela Binnings Ewen was a partner in the Houston office of the international law firm of BakerBotts, L.L.P., specializing in corporate finance. She now lives just outside New Orleans, Louisiana, with her husband, James Lott.

She has served on the Board of Directors of Inprint, Inc., a non-profit organization supporting the literary arts in Houston, Texas, as well as the Advisory Board for The New Orleans Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Society, and currently serves on the Board of Directors of The Tennessee Williams Festival in New Orleans. Pamela is a co-founder of the Northshore Literary Society in the Greater New Orleans area. She is also a member of the National League of American Pen Women.

Pamela’s first novel, Walk Back The Cat (Broadman & Holman. May, 2006) is the story of an embittered and powerful clergyman who learns an ancient secret, confronting him with truth and a choice that may destroy him. She is also the best-selling author of the acclaimed non-fiction book Faith On Trial, published by Broadman & Holman in 1999. It was chosen as a text for a course on law and religion at Yale Law School in the Spring of 2000, along with The Case For Christ by Lee Stroble. Pamela also appears with Gary Habermas, Josh McDowell, Darrell Bock, Lee Stroble, and others in the film Jesus: Fact or Fiction, a Campus Crusade for Christ production.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

At 8:47 A.M. on Wednesday, October 12, 1977, new-to-town businessman Bingham Murdock flew his small plane into New Orleans, banking it in such a way that a ray of sunshine shot through the city at light speed.

Amalise Catoir saw the flash from her sixteenth floor law office window. Finally feeling alive after the death of her abusive husband, she imagined seeing the plane was a fate for her eyes only; a special connection between the unknown giver and she, the recipient of light.

But someone else saw it, a six-year-old Cambodian refugee in foster care for whom a sudden burst of brightness reminds him of artillery fire.

Destined to cross paths with the man and the child, Amalise doesn’t yet know the deeper spiritual lesson she will learn: that we are responsible not only for the things we do, but also for the things that we don’t.

If you would like to read an excerpt of Chasing The Wind, go HERE.

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Word of Inspiration: The Lord Is Our Judge

“For the LORD is our Judge, The LORD is our Lawgiver, The LORD is our King; He will save us.”  Isaiah 33:22

When you are following God's Word and trying to do what is right, do not worry what the world thinks. The world is not your judge, God is. He is also the world's judge, whether or not the world recognizes Him as their judge.  If we obey God's law, we will abide in the blessing of His promised protection, not the consequences of sin. We are called to obey man's law, but if man passes a law that goes against God's law, God's law is higher. He is the King of all kings and over all man-made justice systems. The law of man is corrupt and broken, filtered with mistakes that cannot save us. Only God can save us from ourselves, from our sin, from this world. Put all your faith in the Lord! It's His desire to save you!

Monday, August 06, 2012

Guestpost: "Preparing for and Making the Most of Conferences" by Candy Arrington




A writer's conference is one of the best ways to get a proverbial "foot in the door" in a tight publishing market. But often, people spend lots of money on conference fees, lodging, and travel without doing the necessary preparation, interaction, and follow up to make the most of their investment of time and money. Following are some ways to ensure you get the biggest bang for your buck and a chance to make your publishing dreams a reality:

Prior to the conference:
  • Do your homework – Read the conference brochure or website to determine which publishers will be represented. Then study publisher websites, current book titles, and submission guidelines. Notice the professional writers on faculty also. Look at the class schedule and decide which classes suit your needs. If you wait until you get to the conference to look at the class schedule, you'll end up confused, frustrated, and miss classes you really wanted to take.
  • Gather a clip folder – If you already have publishing credits, compile these in a notebook so you have examples of your work available to support your ideas.
  • Create a one-sheet or pitch sheet – You can do one for each book idea you are pitching. Or have a list of article topics with a one-paragraph synopsis.
  • Prepare an elevator pitch – Come up with a 30-second spiel about your book project or magazine article idea. Then, when an editor turns to you at the dinner table and says, “So, what are you working on?” you won't sit there with a slack jaw until she moves on to the next person.
  • Proposal/Manuscripts – Work weeks or months ahead to get a proposal and sample chapters ready in case an editor wants to look over these once you give a verbal pitch. While an editor may not take your proposal or manuscript at the conference, you're a step ahead when you get home and can email requested material immediately, before the editor has time to forget who you are and what sparked interest about your proposal.
  • Make business cards – Have some writer business cards made (or create them on your computer) that list your contact information and include a picture so editors can remember who you are when they get home. Opt for a professional-looking card rather than a cutesy one.
While at the conference:
  • Be friendly/network – Some conferees are so intent on getting their book published they sport a grimaced face and a barge-ahead attitude. Introduce yourself to everyone, not just editors, and be personable.
  • Be teachable – Attend the conference with an open mind and a teachable spirit. There is a lot to learn in the publishing business so don't go with a know-it-all attitude. You'll appear foolish, plus annoy everyone.
  • Take advantage of freebies – Many conferences offer free copies of books, magazines, publisher catalogues, and writer guidelines. Check out the freebie table and take copies of what interests you.
  • Make appointments with editors and professional writers – Don't be afraid to meet with editors and professional writers. They will not bite! It’s crazy to attend a conference and not make any appointments because you're too nervous or unsure of your writing. Also, realize you'll have to schedule appointments during workshops. Don't "cut" a whole workshop because you are afraid your arrival or departure will interrupt. Presenters expect a revolving door and understand folks will be coming and going.
  • Attend workshops – You paid for them! You can sleep later. You'll never have this much information in one spot until the next conference. Absorb as much info as you can. Make notes and then debrief and distill when you get home.
  • Follow through – Many aspiring writers are plagued by self-doubt once the conference is over and never follow up on the opportunity to send a manuscript or book proposal. You can do it! Don't let the fear of rejection cause you to miss an open door.

Candy Arrington is a multi-published author whose credits include Focus on the Family, Thriving Family, Clubhouse, Living with Teenagers, Encounter, The Lookout, The Upper Room, CBN.com, The Writer,  and Writer's Digest. She is coauthor of When Your Aging Parent Needs Care: Practical Help for This Season of Life (Harvest House Publishers) and AFTERSHOCK: Help, Hope, and Healing in the Wake of Suicide (B & H Publishing Group).

Candy's writing provides support, encouragement, and practical advice, often on tough topics. In addition to her writing, Candy teaches at writers' conferences, speaks on various topics, and does freelance editing.

A native South Carolinian, Candy lives in Spartanburg with her husband, Jim. They have two adult children. She is currently in the process of overseeing the renovation of her childhood home, a house constructed in 1951 by her builder father.
www.CandyArrington.com                                  

Thursday, August 02, 2012

Book Review - "A Necessary Deception by Laurie Alice Eakes

#christianromance, #christianfiction

Book Description

When young widow Lady Lydia Gale helps a French prisoner obtain parole, she never dreamed he would turn up in her parlor. But just as the London Season is getting under way, there he is, along with a few other questionable personages. While she should be focused on helping her headstrong younger sister prepare for her entrĂ© into London society, Lady Gale finds herself preoccupied with the mysterious Frenchman. Is he a spy or a suitor? Can she trust him? Or is she putting her family in danger?

Readers will enjoy being drawn into this world of elegance and intrigue, balls and masquerades. Author Laurie Alice Eakes whisks readers through the drawing rooms of London amid the sound of rustling gowns on this exciting quest to let the past stay in the past and let love guide the future.

My Review
This is a well-written Christian historical English Regency. While it has the style of a traditional Regency following the historical detail and accuracy of the time period and places of London, it has an intriguing thread of mystery. I absolutely love books like this! Historical romantic suspense would be a great subcategory for it. 

The characters are interesting and the plot thickens as you read through the story and wonder how they will all get out of their predicament. While Lydia acted as a proper lady in the English Regency era, I love the way she was also different and had her own personality. She wasn't too constricted by the rules of the time. It was interesting that the hero was French at a time when England was at war with the French during the Napoleonic War. This made their romance even more interesting as it progressed at a natural and appropriate rate. This is a wonderful book that I highly recommend!

Purchase the book here.

Visit Laure Alice Eakes, here